Archive | R&E

Bucket biology and its impact on Oregon’s fisheries (Part 1)

bucket biology

In the cool waters of Diamond Lake, anglers can fish for rainbow trout surrounded by the beauty of Diamond Peak and the encompassing forest.

In eastern Oregon’s Ontario, at a location accessible by car, entry-level anglers can find easy fishing success thanks to a schooling blue gill population.

And in the mountainous areas of Central Oregon, fisheries for kokanee, brown trout and rainbow trout are alive and well in Paulina and East lakes, part of the Newberry Crater.

Yet these fisheries and many others like them throughout Oregon are always at risk thanks to a silent danger that could at any time begin lurking below their surfaces.

Invasive species introduced to the lakes and reservoirs by individuals who dump leftover live bait into the water, not realizing the harm, or by others who want to change the fishing grounds themselves, take over.

This so-called “bucket biology” is harmful to fisheries, disappointing for anglers who count on getting a good catch at their favorite lakes, and it’s illegal with a hefty fine for those who are caught.

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ODFW R&E Board position open

ODFW R&E ProgramEvery year, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Restoration and Enhancement Program gives $2 million to $3 million to fishery projects that benefit sport and commercial fisheries. The projects aim for a balance of both restoration and enhancement, to continually improve our state’s fishing grounds.

The program’ board studies proposed projects, listens to public comment on them, and makes recommendations for funding to the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission.

One of the people helping to make these important project recommendations could be you.

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is seeking applicants for the board’s public-at-large position. The position is one of seven, with the others divided evenly between the commercial and sports fishing interests.

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Treating Northeast Oregon Ponds with Rotenone

RotenoneWhen people release illegal fish ­­– goldfish, crappie, bass and bullheads – into lakes or streams, they reduce the survival rates and growth of stocked trout. This was the case with several bodies of water in northeastern Oregon including Balm Creek Reservoir, Kinney Lake, and ponds called Lugar, Boundary, Keyhole, Yellowjacket, Granite Meadows, and Goldfish. Continue Reading →

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