Archive | R&E

Collaborative Coquille project brings opportunities for fish and recreation

At the new Coquille Valley Wildlife Area on the southern Oregon coast, hunters can get their limit of ducks and other waterfowl. Anglers can catch bass, bluegill, catfish and crappie. Photographers and wildlife watchers can spot a variety of species.

“This particular area is one that has a lot of natural resources in it in terms of bird life and fish life, and in the past it’s been all privately controlled and largely inaccessible,” said Stuart Love, district wildlife biologist for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and manager of the Coquille Valley Wildlife Area. “This allows public access to public lands in an area where there were essentially no public lands before.” Continue Reading →

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Projects prioritize angling success

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Restoration & Enhancement program has improved fish and fishing throughout Oregon since it began in 1989.

When fishing licenses are purchased in Oregon, a portion is dedicated to R&E. An advisory board makes recommendations on funding each year, allocating $2 to $3 million annually to projects that benefit sport and commercial fisheries. Continue Reading →

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R&E funds improve hatcheries

The board of directors for ODFW’s Restoration & Enhancement program makes having strong runs of salmon a priority.

To make this happen, R&E has worked strategically with other state agencies and outside partners to complete long-deferred maintenance at hatcheries throughout Oregon. Fees collected as part of angler licenses make this possible. Continue Reading →

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R&E funds make improvements to access and opportunities for Oregon anglers

The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and other organizations throughout the state, continue to improve boating and angling in Oregon lakes, rivers and streams. Here are a few highlights of recent and ongoing improvements in the northeastern part of the state:

 

Wallowa Watershed District

Kinney Lake and Weaver Pond –  Parking areas for both fishing sites received upgrades in early December. The project included leveling surfaces, filling potholes and adding large rock and small gravel. It was intended to “make nicer surfaces” in areas that were previously muddy, said Kyle Bratcher, ODFW assistant district fish biologist. Continue Reading →

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R&E Funds Make Great Improvements to Access and Facilities for Oregon Anglers (Part 2 of 3)

Where once there were broken docks, recreational fishermen now gather to cast a line.

In areas that lacked a good fishing hole, kids visit one with mom or dad – and without a long car ride to get there.

A lengthy list of completed projects highlight the progress of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife’s 25-year angling enhancement plan, now about one-third of the way through its established timeline.

The numbers underline the Restoration & Enhancement Board’s commitment to providing Oregon anglers with a place to fish and fish to catch, as well as fishing education for residents in urban and rural areas throughout the state.

“One of the things that we’re very careful to look at is what’s the benefit for fishermen,” said Richard Heap, who serves on ODFW’s R&E board. “The bottom line is it’s their money.”

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Projects provide better access for anglers in southeastern Oregon

Improved Fishing AccessThe Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and other organizations throughout the state, continue to improve boating and angling in Oregon lakes, rivers and streams. Here are a few highlights of recent and ongoing improvements in the southeastern part of the state:

Southeast Watershed District

Beck-Kiwanis Pond – Ontario’s Beck-Kiwanis Pond now has a successful “two-story” fishery with both warm water and cold water fish, said Dave Banks, district fish biologist for the Southeast Watershed District. Prior to a project in early 2015 that cleared goldfish and carp out of the pond, an estimated 99 percent of fish populations were carp. Now, anglers can catch blue gill, bass and rainbow trout. ODFW plans to do an assessment soon to give it a baseline number it can use to assess fish populations now and in the future.

Owyhee Reservoir – With more than 3,000 launches/retrievals per year at Indian Creek State Park, this reservoir is popular with largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie, yellow perch and catfish anglers. Improvements began in 2014 and were finished in 2016, scheduled to avoid bass and crappie spawning periods. They included replacement of the boat ramp and the boarding dock system, reconfiguration of the maneuver area and expanded parking with ADA accessibility, said Holly Huchko of ODFW. The improvements, which cost over $1 million, were funded by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife through U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Sport Fish Restoration funds, Oregon State Marine Board, Bureau of Reclamation and Oregon State Parks and Recreation Department.

 

Image: © Oregon State Marine Board

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Restoration improves fishing in Central Oregon

Restoration Improves FishingFishing’s good at North Twin Lake, thanks to an ODFW focus on restoring fishing for the community. In Fall 2015, ODFW treated North Twin Lake with rotenone to remove illegally introduced brown bullhead catfish. This was made possible thanks to Restoration & Enhancement funding, which provided $330,000 to the fishing turnaround efforts.

Read more about the fish and efforts to improve the lake, which stays open to anglers throughout the year, in The (Bend) Bulletin: http://www.bendbulletin.com/outdoors/5447517-151/fishing-north-twin-lake

 

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Test program could lead to bigger fish in high lakes

Test program could lead to bigger fishWhen anglers head to northeastern Oregon’s Eagle Cap Wilderness, they may soon catch bigger fish.

That is the hoped-for outcome of an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife test case in which larger rainbow trout were dropped into the high lakes with the goal of improving survival of the stocked fish.

The smaller stocked trout, usually 2.5 inches long, can succumb to predation, frigid temperatures and injuries caused by the drop.

Continue Reading →

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Efforts limit invaders in Diamond Lake

Invaders harm trout

ODFW stocked Diamond Lake with two types of predator fish to eat tui chub and golden shiners, which have historically deteriorated water quality and harmed populations of rainbow trout.

Restoration & Enhancement dollars have been instrumental in ongoing monitoring efforts, as well as paying for some of the treatments that have helped remove illegally introduced fish.

Read more about the most recent efforts in The Oregonian: http://www.oregonlive.com/sports/oregonian/bill_monroe/index.ssf/2017/08/sterile_trout_will_prey_on_inv.html

 

Image: Wikimedia Commons / Matthew Tyree / Public Domain

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